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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
is something we should fear right now, since i was born there have been about 50,000 wiretaps approved by law enforcement. every year for last couple years more than 1.5 million requests have been made by law enforcement mostly through technology companies, without us knowing about it we can't find out who did it. there has been a game change over the last 10 years esince 9/11, where pendulum swung way in direction of government actually knowing a hell of a lot more about you know that they used to, that is troubling. neil: i think that the jeannie is out of the bottle, and whether government know spired or not -- inspired or not, the fact is when we hop to web sites, and allow ourselves to be an open book. we open our books, i'm saying where does it go. >> we as people have the right to do that as an individual. if i want to put my entire life out there great, but i can block my cousin and friend from facebook, but to matt's point, people don't know the kind of information that is being compiled from having your grocery store card. neil: government could overstep your block, you know? >> go
. i want to congratulate and thank all of the law enforcement authorities for the extraordinary job that they have been doing on behalf of our citizens. in the past few days, we have seen the best and the worst of human behavior. it is the best that all of us really want to focus on. like everyone, we are going to keep watching. we will await word from the law enforcement officers before commenting further. it's a huge easure fore and an important moment to welcome one of our most important partners, our close neighbor and our friend, and i want to welcome my friend, the secretary. one of the first calls i made when i became secretary of state was to josé. we share an alma mater together. he was a graduate student, i was an undergraduate. whatever we don't say right today, you can blame it on them. we obviously share much much more than alma mater. both of us are privileged to represent our extraordinary countries. we share a remarkable friendship and very strong partnership that is growing stronger all the time. for generations we have lived side-by-side as families and neighbors,
with this legislation. we are a safer country when law- enforcement knows who is here, has their fingerprints, photos, conduct background checks, and no wonder these to look at needles through haystacks. both the refugee program and asylum program have been significantly strengthened in the past five years, such that we are much more careful about screening people in determining who should or should not be coming into the country. if there are any changes that our homeland security experts tell us we need to be made -- s, security experts tell us need to be made -- a there were widespread erroneous reports of arrests being made. this emphasizes how important it is to let the facts come out before jumping to any conclusions. mostieve this is the balanced piece of immigration legislation that has been ever produced. the american people and all of our colleagues should read this bill over the next few weeks. they will have ample time to look at every page and every paragraph before we go to markup in the committee. what they will find is a bill the secures our borders, combats the overstay, cracks down
grateful for that. we o'a tremendous debt of gratitude to all of our law enforcement professionals. these men and women get up every day and they show up every day they are going don't always know what to expect. our thoughts thare wi the victims and we pray if you are eir recovwe send our prayers e collier family. police rn to be a officer. he was just 26 years old. his family said he died bravely and he committed his life to serving and protecting others. obviously, on the there is many other answered questions. among them, why did young men who grew up and studied here as part of our communities and country resort to such violence. how did they plan an carry out these attacks and did they receive any help? the families of those killed so senselessly deserve answers. the wounded, some of whom have to learn how to stand, walk, and live again, deserve answers. so i've instructed the f.b.i. and our intelligence community to continue to deploy all of the necessary resources to support the investigation, to collect intelligence, and to protect our citizens. we will determine what ha
election campaigning on friday the upper house has agreed to revise the public offices election law. people in the country will get their first taste of online campaigning, starting with this summer's upper house race. nhk world has the details. >> reporter: the bill was passed unanimously by the upper house. from now on, political parties, candidates and voters will be allowed to enlist public support on websites and social networking services. japanese law has long limited the number of paper documents that can be distributed during official campaigns. the rule was meant to keep candidates with a financial edge from getting an unfair advantage. but the law, enacted in 1950, did not envision the internet. documents and images in cyber space have been regulated in the same way. japan has lagged behind other countries such as the united states, britain and germany, where there are few restrictions on internet election campaigning. >> translator: communication tools are completely different from the old days. it's good to update the law. >> translator: i'm all for the revision. i'm busy with
system of justice. under u.s. law, the united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions, and it is important to remember that since 9/11 we have used the federal court system to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists. >> dzhokhar tsarnaev and his brother originally born in kyrgyzstan charged. tamerlan tsarnaev is dead after a shootout with police, dzhokhar has a gunshot wound to his neck after police apprehended him friday night. a source with firsthand knowledge of the investigation tells cnn that dzhokhar tar neve is on a breathing ventilator and heavily sedated. as we talk about the suspects' future, we cannot forget about those who lost their lives. let's take time to recall them, chris tell krystle campbell, 8-year-old martin richard whose mom and sister were greefsly wounded and 23 year ode linzie lu a boston university graduate student from china. and then of course m.i.t. officer gunned down, 26-year-old sean collier. we're told vice president biden will attend a memorial service for him on wednesday. as we mentioned, dzhokhar tsarnaev won't be charged as
to the success to the law enforcement investigation. it will be equally important as the city works to reclaim and restore boylston street. we have been working closely with business owners to near the plaza and opening up a mobile city hall close to the area for visitors to have fast a access to the city. also our team has been in communication with the victims and the families who continue to work as we move towards opening the area of boston for our public once again. i want to say to my team behind me, thank you for doing a great job. last week or so, all the agencies and since friday have been working overtime to make sure that the plan works to reestablish boylston street. they have been working under all the plans. thank you. >> heather: you've been listening to a live news conference. the mayor talking about a five-step plan now to reopen boylston street, perhaps the most famous street in america. the area specifically affected when this bombing happened last monday at the boston marathon. let's go to adam housley who is still standing by live for us. i understand you were just in the
surveillance by law enforcement officers. as you mentioned he was intubated and sedated with serious injuries. as the investigation continues the focus today is on what charges he will face and when. one week after two deadly bombs exploded in downtown boston, killing three and injuring 183 people, the only surviving suspect remains in serious condition at beth israel deaconess medical center. as federal prosecutors prepare to bring charges against him, law enforcement sources say dzhokhar tsarnaev is unable to talk after a gunshot wound to the neck. exactly when he suffered this injury is still unknown. >> this is a very complex investigation, and it's hard to say exactly how he received that injury. there was certainly a shoot-out in watertown. there were explosives thrown. so that's being looked into right now. it's hard to say exactly how it occurred. >> reporter: we're learning more about the tense moments right before tsarnaev's arrest. this aerial video shows infrared images of him hiding out on a boat in the backyard of a home in watertown. according to a law enforcement source close
. anderson. >> all right. don. appreciate that. bottom line there, he's communicating with law enforcement personnel via writing. we are getting new information about the wounded suspect. let's go to deborah. >> hi. i'm being told by sources being briefed on the investigation that the 19-year-old suspect is on a ventilator and heavily sedated. every several hours in the care of doctors, an interview team goes into the room to ask the suspect questions. now these questions are pretty much focused, according to my source, on public safety. for example, are there any other bombs? are there any other bomb stashes? are is there any other weapons? he has been been on a ventilator and he is restrained in part because they don't want him to rip the tube out of his throat. we've been hearing law enforcement has been communicating in writing, but what we do know is he is nodding. the responses he is giving are being given by nodding. there appears to be some sort of wound to his leg. it appears due to blood loss. he did have a wound to the back of his neck. it is not clear how that wound was inflict
verbally. he's in the intensive care unit of beth israel hospital here. our susan candiotti citing a law enforcement official with knowledge of the case saying dzhokhar tsarnaev was shot in the side of the neck. unclear whether that came during friday night's takedown of him when he was captured or shootout he and his brother had thursday night into friday morning with police in the streets of watertown. right now no charges were filed today. we heard rumblings there may be charges filed today. ended up not being the case, don. maybe in the next couple of days. >> all right. let's talk about the bombs. you have learned something new, something about where they came from, brian. >> reporter: that's right. our susan candiotti citing a law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation says the current thinking right now, don, is the two suspects bought the bomb components locally. somewhere here in the boston area. but that they got the guns from somewhere else. this official emphasizing that the gun traces are under way right now. and so that part of the investigation is continu
? >> well, first of all, is public safety, of course. there are armed law enforcement officers, federal, state, local, out there trying to get this guy. another suspect is armed. may even have a suicide vest on. they have additional explosives. unfortunately, civilians will just get in the wake. that would be a terrible -- terrible tragedy if someone comes out of the door a think it is in the vicinity of where the suspect is and someone gets shot. very important that people stay and of the late, let law-enforcement do their job. get this person, apprehend them and start to figure out what else we need to worry about and then, obviously, go back to figure out what we missed, we should have known, what the connections are inside or outside of the country. dagen: can you give us any prospective? these two brothers had been in the u.s. for at least ten years coming year originally from chechnya to my coming here with roughly 2002-2003 based on reports. and then executing allegedly this bombing at the boston marathon. can you compare this to anything of this country has ever seen or face bef
be appropriate under federal law in this case. >> big debates just getting going. >> is. and it will go on for a long time. the court case will drag on with people second guessing judgments made. >>> a deadly effort quake has hit southwestern china we keep our gaze on boston but we are also looking to china where saturday violent shaking woke up its people. the death toll is climbing in a region familiar with the deadly earthquakes. çñ >>> this is live coverage of the aftermat aftermath. >> we'll have more from boston in a few minutes, we want to trache you to other parts of the world and other headlines we're watching. by the end of sunday, local activists say the bodies of 566 people killed over the preceding six-day period were found across syria. 566 bodies. we warn you the images you're about to see are disturbing. at least 450 victims were said to have been found in a damascus suburb. cnn cannot independently verify the images or the information we're bringing you from inside syria. >>> we turn our attention to china. the death toll is climbing after a powerful earthquake struck
community and the attacks are impossible for the federal law enforcement community to stop. so how to make ourselves more resilient? the steps we need to take are not that sexy. we need to upgrade our transit systems and infrastructure so as to make them less vulnerable to attacks. for example, flynn notes the u.s. navy has invested more in protecting the single port of san diego that is home to the pacific fleet than the department of homeland security has invest ed in the ports of ls angeles, long beach, san francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column
process ahead of us. with a former united states attorney general, the nation's chief law enforcement officer, michael mukasey, who was chief judge in the southern district of new york, presided over the blind sheik trial as well as the jose padilla case. good evening, judge. >> good evening, judge. >> good to have you back, judge. >> today we heard there will be no charges filed against the younger brother dzhokhar. how long can the justice department wait to file charges? >> they can wait really as long as they'd like. the fact is that he -- the only down side for them is the possibility that any statement that he makes might not be able to be used at trial. they've got so much evidence, including his own confession to the person whose car he carjacked, that the likely they need any statement from him as evidence in the trial is remote. >> right. you know, judge, a lot of people h ve been talking about miranda, the public safety exception. i don't want to spend a lot of time on that. but, you know, when the police announced that the public threat was over, once dzhokhar was taken in
of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather, is grounded in a hoe row and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constitute torture. in addition, you look at the united states state department, in its annual country reports on human rights practices, has characterized many of the techniques used against detainees in u.s. custody in the post-9/11 environment, the state department has characterized the same treatment as torture, abuse, or cruel treatment when those techniques were employed by foreign governments. the c.i.a. recognized this in an internal review and that many of the interrogation techniques it employed were inconsistent with policy, positions the united states has taken regarding human rights. the united states is understandably subject to criticism when it criticized another nation for engaging in tor
. law enforcement has asked the residents of watertown, massachusetts, to stay home and businesses to stay shut as the manhunt is underway. mass transit is also shut down in. the boston in we would like to get your reaction to what's happening this morning. the headline in the boston globe is -- in.nsl us to weig you can also find us online. send us a tweet. and we can share that on the air. on facebook, look for c-span. or e-mail us. here is the boston globe this morning. looking at the story in the metro section -- state authorities asked people live in the region to stay home in the cities and towns to stay closed. here's a tweet from the associated press. old, from cambridge massachusetts. dzkh tsarnaev is his name. also, looking at the boston herald, local papers are giving us this news. governor deval patrick made the order for residents in the area of boston and water 10 to stay indoors. we would like to get your reaction to this news this morning. we have some comments coming from facebook. patricia writes -- sandy says -- is on the line from arkansas, a democrat. caller: g
and terrorist groups. leven said to hold him under these circumstances would be contrary to our laws and jeopardize our effort to prosecute him. during interviews before suspects are read their rights is often not admissible during the trial. the issue on miranda rights is further complicated because the u.s. is a u.s. citizen. many of the rules cannot be used on americans. live in the newsroom, katie utehs. ktvu news. >>> people are in texas are being allowed in their homes. curfew is still in effect and there is limited water and electricity. many are still trying to learn the condition of family and friends hurt in the explosion. >> it's really hectic, but we are patient because we know the extent of damage on the other side. and we got friends and family that we don't know about over there. >> 14 people died in the fertilizer plant explosion, including 11 emergency responders. 200 more were injured. >>> this weekend, texas is also remembering the deadly raid on the branch compound in waco. 76 people died in a fire twenty years ago following a raid on the compound. waco and west
of prosperity and of nations living by rule of law and of nation's living in peace. countries where strong human rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the wo
ago. >> we are hearing that from a law-enforcement official. there was an interview at the request of a foreign government. concernequested out of that the fbi spoke with him two years ago because there was concern that before he was about to make an overseas trip, he had in extremist ties. the fbi spoke with him and reported back to the foreign government that they had no concern and this trip would be ok. following this trip, we are hearing that he went to russia where he had family and he came back much more religious and much more observant of his islamic faith. this came from friends that knew him. this is something that will now be a part of this investigation as the president, after speaking with reporters, following the arrest, there will be a full investigation and the full federal resources will be dedicated to answering some of these questions. that is one question that will be examined -- if there was a concern and he was on the radar, why wasn't it followed up on? thank you. more and more is being learned about the two tysarnaev brothers. there were chechen nationals w
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
on "today in the bay." some 9,000 people from every law enforcement agency near and far descended on boston to help catch the the two men who terrorized the city. coming up on "today in the bay," we sit down with an expert on s.w.a.t. emergency communication to discuss what it takes to keep the country safe from these types of attacks. this and all the morning's top stories coming up at 7:00 on "today in the bay. we'll have another local update for you in 30 minutes. for now, back to the "today" show. [ male announcer ] a car that can actually see like a human, using stereoscopic cameras. ♪ and even stop itself if it has to. ♪ the technology may be hard to imagine. but why you would want it... is not. the 2014 e-class. it doesn't just see the future. it is the future. >>> celebration in the streets of boston. relieved residents there thanking law enforcement officers for their bravery last night. cheering the "usa" after remaining boston bombing suspect was captured. it came after a dramatic end to these events. a hail of gunfire followed a day in which included an unprecedented lockdow
of retirement and health care benefits is consistent with what is required by the federal law of ups, federal express and every other almost every other corporation in the country it would be very similar. >> it could be different from what the private sector companies are doing. i would like to know, i would like to make that available to the postal employees that i represent throughout the country. >> you are correct but it's not the same for health care benefits. i will provide a more detailed record. >> you are saying the postal service now is operating at 140% of current revenue; is that the number you gave? >> drm laes, unfunded liabilities. >> bankruptcy would probably be where they are. >> finally let me go to something completely unrelated. you testified he wanted more flexibility in their rates in respect to packaging the monopoly on first-class they would have it facto monopoly on the third clause catalogs and what people would refer to as door hangers and nobody has the reach you do. how do you give that flexibility without giving you the power to do sweetheart deals and take the
's marathon bomb, now responding to investigator's questions. law enforcement trying to piece together what was behind the attacks. scott cohn has the latest on the investigation. good morning, scott. >> good morning, andrew. we expect there could be criminal charges against dzhokhar tsarnaev today. chillingly after the bombing a week with ago today, he and his brother tamerlan appeared to resume their normal lives. friends say he was at dartmouth, work withing out at the gym, talking about the bombing. and they are still in disbelief. >> it's hard top comprehend someone could go doing normal college kid stuff to bombing a marathon. >> and that about the older brother, tamerlan, 26 years old? he apparently talked to his parents in russia after the bombing and said everything was okay. he he went back to russia last year and was not interviewed afterwards. that has some on capitol hill wondering how did the intelligent agencies miss this? >> the fact that we could not track him as to be fixed. it's people like this that you don't want to let out of your site. this was a mistake. i don't know
or possibly change the laws. what's expected here on the boston marathon bombing investigation when i see you next. kyla campbell, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you. >>> the man accused of mailing a letter containing ricin to president obama is expected back in court. paul kevin curtis has denied any involvement sent to the president or other letters sent to a senator or judge. his attorneys say there's little evidence connecting him to the letters but curtis's family says he does suffer from mental illness. >>> we're hearing the frantic 911 calls made from a deadly explosion at a fert light ez -- fertilizer plant in west, texas. >> there's been an explosion at my house. all of the windows are completely in. >> at least 14 people were killed in last wednesday's explosion and 200 more were injured. ten of those killed were first responders. >> listen, to me. the station just totally exploded. i have a nursing home and an ammo station and i need as much help that you can sent. >> some were able to return home. howf, they have strict curfews and limited water -- however, they have strict curfews
tsarnaev treated as an enemy combatant under the laws of war. lester? >> michael isakoff, thank you. for more on the government's attempts to find out what motivated these suspects, we're joined by nbc's chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell. in our washington bureau, andrea? >> good evening, lester. intelligence officials, the fbi, a global search for what motivated tamerlan tsarnaev's terrorism. was it chechnyan nationalism, at the white house today, the president met again in the situation room with his national security advisers. he was briefed by the fbi director and top counterterrorism officials and others for 0 minutes. an official tells us afterwards that so far, there is no evidence of foreign involvement, but they're looking. they also say they are getting good cooperation now from russia, with whom as you know the u.s. has had very rocky relations over the last few years. russia's president vladimir putin spoke with president obama last night and the two leaders are discussing the importance of working more closely together on counterterrorism in the futur
, provide a safer environment for law enforcement activities. logan airport remains open under heightened security and those flights are departing and arriving on schedule. melissa: thanks so much. we want to keep you up-to-date on the latest developments out of boston. we are a financial network so we want to bring you up to speed on how the boston-based businesses are eacting to the situation. emc corp. telling fox business they have asked employees to work from home today if they live in affected areas. we heard from l p l financial closed their offices and told employees to stay home. these are a few companies that are headquartered or had prominent office in the boston area. we are following the details on the unfolding manhunt in and around boston and we will bring the latest information as we receive it. melissa: we are live on the trading floor of the cme and the stock exchange coming up next. lori: exclusive interview with vanguard ceo bill mcnabb, best selling mutual fund company on record-breaking first quarter. melissa: look at medals as we head to break. the stock market dow
just yet. as you know, an m.i.t. law enforcement officer was, sean collier was killed on tuesday night and that murder has not been charged yet at all and we should see the state do more work on that front in the coming days and weeks, we expect. >> as you talk about going forward in all this what do we know of how the process progresses from here? there was that legal hearing on monday. what happens next? >> that was just the very beginning, a complaint was filed. he still will have to appear in court, be indicted and there is a hearing set for may 30th at 10:00 a.m. that the judge mentioned in this hearing monday morning. >> before i let you go, erin what do we know about legal defense? did he have legal representation in that hospital room? >> reporter: i have the transcript of the court hearing here there is controversy on friday and over the weekend about him not being mirandized. they went through it twice today and offered the use of an attorney and the one word he spoke was no when asked if he could afford an attorney and he was presented with defense attorneys today. >>> we wa
filmed here earlier on the week, seen him on the news for the first time. and then for son-in-law reason, he tells me this is dzhokhar and tamerlan, and points at the screen and says here is tamerlan in the blue jacket and dzhokhar in the white jacket. and i say anzor, these are guys with the backpack when the photos are shown. it can't be them. he says i don't know, these are my children. and then his wife grabs the tv screen and starts screaming, i can't be, it can't be happening. i don't believe it. the children are dead. i would have cried out myself. >> reporter: nick walsh, cnn. >>> it was russia that asked the fbi to look into tamerlan tsarnaev's activities back in 2011. moscow said the older brother was increasingly turning to radical islam. bill black joins us now live from moscow where it is 9:36 in the morning. phil, the chronology of this may surprise people, because it seems that the return to radical islam, the request from moscow came before he traveled back to his ancestral homeland. is that the word you're hearing from russian officials, that they were worried even befor
, marking a dramatic turn for law enforcement officials trying to piece together what was behind that attack. our scott cohn is in boston and has the latest on the investigation. scott, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carl. it's hard to believe it's been one week since those horrible bombings at the end of the boston marathon. later today at 2:50 local time, the precise time of those bombings one week ago, there will be a moment of silence in boston and church bells will toll throughout the city. dzhokhar tsarnaev, the 19-year-old bombing suspect remains in serious condition where he is recovering from his wound, but apparently he is alert enough to begin responding to some of the investigators' questions. many of those responses in writing because he has gunshot wound possibly, self-inflicted to the throat, but amazingly, he and his brother for some three days managed to hide in plain sight. dzhokhar at umass dartmouth where he was a student, he worked out in the gym, even talked to friends about the bombing. imagine how chilling that was for his classmates. >> i'm in diss belief,
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)